Sunday, November 24, 2013

Nikon D5100 DSLR for beginners

<Nikon D5300 Black Friday Dealimg src="http://www.product-reviews.net/wp-content/uploads/Nikon-D5100-DSLR-for-beginners-728x500.jpg">

CLICK THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE

By Peter Chubb Posted 24 Nov 2013, 10:50

So you have just taken possession of Nikon D5100 DSLR for beginners and even though it has basic features when compared to other DSLR models, they are still far more complex than a compact camera, and so will take a lot more studying to get to grips with.

The best way to learn these features is by watching a couple of Nikon D5100 tutorial for beginners videos, which we just so happen to have embedded for you below.

In the first video you get to learn all about the settings for the D5100 on the info menu screen, such as how to change them and what they all mean. Using the info screen is the easiest and fastest way to change how your camera works.

The tutorial has been split into two videos, and so we have the second video for you as well. Neither video goes into detail about exposures and other more technical settings, but they will get you started.

You might wonder why people would wish to purchase a camera that is now a couple of years old, but like we explained with the Canon EOS Rebel T3, these features are still better than many compact cameras, and ideal if you are new two DSLR.

You can add us to your circle on Google+, follow us on Twitter, join the photo community on Pinterest, or like our Facebook page to keep updated on all the latest news.


Source: Product-reviews

Friday, November 22, 2013

UPDATE: Sigma has released firmware to fix compatibility problems with Nikon D5300

<Nikon D5300 Discountp>You can now download firmware for a number of Sigma lenses that should correct the problems Nikon D5300 users may experience with its lenses

UPDATE 22/11/13:

Sigma has released firmware to fix the problems with the following lenses:

・35mm F1.4 DG HSM A012 NIKON
・17-70mm F2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM C013 NIKON
・30mm F1.4 DC HSM A013 NIKON
・18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM A013 NIKON
・120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM S013 NIKON

The update should make these lenses fully functional with the Nikon D5300. See here for more information and the download link.

ORIGINAL STORY 19/11/13:

In a statement on its website, Sigma has said that the current firmware of its Nikon-fit interchangeable lenses 'may not work properly with the Nikon D5300's OS and Live View Auto Focus functions'.

Though it hasn't released specific details, Sigma has said that the problem occurs specifically with Nikon-fit interchangable lenses that incorporate an internal motor.

Sigma will be releasing a free firmware update tomorrow (November 20) that it says should correct the problem. You can contact your nearest Sigma dealer in order to receive the update; Sigma provides a full list here.

See Sigma's website for the full statement.

--

We recently completed the What Digital Camera review of the Nikon D5300


Source: Whatdigitalcamera

Friday, November 15, 2013

Nikon Df Digital SLR Camera

<Nikon D5300 Discountp>

Nikon has released the Df, a light and smaller-size full frame D-SLR. The new camera is equipped with mechanical dials for setting shutter speed, ISO sensitivity, exposure compensation, exposure mode and release mode independently to bring users the flexibility and control.

The Df features a 16.2-megapixel full frame CMOS sensor and the EXPEED 3 image processing engine, with an ISO range of 100-12800 (expandable from 50 to 204800).

Some fun tidbits about the Df:

  • The camera features a shutter release mode that enables users to capture a high-speed continuous stream of images at approximately 5.5 frames per second.
  • It is the first Nikon digital SLR camera equipped with a collapsible metering coupling lever, which allows photographers to make use of the full range of Nikon lenses, including non-AI lenses.
  • It is compatible with the SDXC and UHS-I standard memory cards, as well as the Eye-Fi cards.

The Nikon Df comes in classic black or silver with a leatherette finish.

The one thing missing from the Df is video. It can't shoot it. The exclusion of video no doubt helps keep the camera size down.

The cost for the Nikon Df is about $3,000, which includes the body and a AF-S Nikkor 50mm F1.8G lens, which matches the retro look and feel of the camera.

The Nikon Df is a powerful device. The retro look is cool, and the small size is a big plus. If you're not interested in shooting video, it makes for an attractive digital SLR.


Comment Below:

About Matthew Breen

A Pursuitist co-founder, Matt is blogging about travel, auto, gadgets, food and drink. Based in Colorado, Matt loves to share the latest luxury. Follow author Matt Breen on Google +.


Source: Pursuitist

Monday, November 11, 2013

Nikon Unveils D5300 D-SLR With Wi-Fi

Nikon D5300 Black Friday Deal-d5300.jpg?thumb=y">

Nikon didn't wait very long to update its excellent D5200 digital SLR. That camera, announced internationally last November, didn't make its U.S. debut until CES in January, and less than a year later we have its successor.

On the exterior the new D5300 is pretty much the same as its predecessor-the only notable change is an LCD that's a bit larger (3.2 inches) and sharper (1,037k dots) than the 3-inch, 921k-dot vari-angle display found on the D5200.

Despite boasting the same 24-megapixel resolution as its predecessor, the D5300's image sensor is a different design. It's the same one that is found in the D7100. That means that it omits the optical low-pass filter (OLPF). Professional medium format digital cameras have long done away with the OLPF, which saps up a bit of detail in order to eliminate the possibility of color moire appearing in images. Over the past couple years, more and more smaller format cameras have dropped the OLPF, including Nikon's own D800E and the Pentax K-5 IIs. But the D5300 is the first camera we've seen that is squarely aimed at the consumer market to take this approach.

The EXPEED 4 image processor is also new to the D5300, replacing the EXPEED 3 chip that powered the D5200. This is the first Nikon camera with this image processor, but the company promises that it will deliver improved performance in low light and faster operation overall. The native ISO range is ISO 100 through 12800, with 25600 available as an expanded option. The metering and focus systems are the same as the D5200-that gives the camera a 2,016-pixel RGB sensor for scene recognition and 39 selectable autofocus. Like its predecessor, the D5300 is rated to shoot at 5 frames per second.

The other big internal upgrade is the addition of built-in Wi-Fi. Previously Nikon D-SLR owners had to purchase the WU-1a adapter to add wireless connectivity to their cameras. This feature is built into the D5300, so you can transfer photos wirelessly to an iOS or Android device without the need for an add-on. A GPS module is also built into the camera, so your location is added to photo metadata automatically. You'll be able to look at shots on a map when using software like iPhoto or Picasa, or sharing online via a hosting service that includes a map view, like Smugmug.

The D5300 will be available in black, red, or dark gray. It's priced at $799.95 as a body only, or $1,099.95 with an 18-140mm lens. It will be available to purchase in mid-November.

This announcement comes on the heels of news of the D610, a very minor update to the full-frame D600. It's essentially the same camera, but with an improved shutter that allows for a 6fps continuous shooting rate. Many D600 owners reported that the camera has a tendency to pick up dust on the sensor after extended use. It wasn't something we saw with our review unit, and sensor dust is a common issue with all interchangeable lens cameras, but the noise that D600 owners made indicated that it was something beyond what is normally expected.

Nikon issued a service advisory for the D600 relating to the dust issue. The company is not saying that the new shutter is there to reduce the instances of dust accumulation; rather, the official line is that it improves the burst shooting rate and also introduces a new 3fps quiet continuous mode.

The D610 comes in at a $100 less than its predecessor; it's priced at $1,999.95 as a body only, and can be purchased in a kit with the 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 lens for $2,599.95.

Rounding out the Nikon announcements is a new high-end prime lens. The AF-S Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G matches the focal length of the classic Noct-Nikkor 58mm f/1.2, but its aperture isn't quite as ambitious. The new lens features the latest nanocrystal coatings, ED and aspherical elements, and an internal SWM focus motor. It's priced at $1,699.95 and will be available at the end of October.


Source: Pcmag

Friday, November 1, 2013

Nikon D5300 hands-on review

Nikon Nikon D5300 Cyber Monday Deal at a glance:

  • 24.2-million-pixel, APS-C-sized CMOS sensor
  • 1.037-million-dot, 3.2in, 170° LCD screen
  • Expeed 4 image processor
  • 39-point AF system with nine cross-type sensors
  • ISO 100-25,600
  • Price £730 body only

Nikon D5300 - Introduction

While the serious enthusiast is unlikely to be swayed into buying a Nikon DSLR over a Canon model purely because the Nikon camera is newer, the reality is that at the non-premium end of the market this is how some people make their buying decisions. 'Newer' must mean 'better'.

This demand for the 'new' explains why we see such short product cycles in the camera market, and why manufacturers feel the need to introduce even small advances in technology or feature sets in cameras with completely new names - rather than a 'Mark II' type of naming format.

Those familiar with Nikon's range of DSLRs may not see the sense in the company's introduction of the new D5300, especially as Nikon will maintain the D5200 alongside this model in the range - new and old together. By doing so, though, Nikon expands the number of cameras it has on offer and the number of price points it can cover, while also being able to have a model that can carry a 'New' sticker, and which introduces new features to the price band in which it will sit.

That's not to say that the Nikon D5300 isn't different to the D5200, though, as a new processor, new body design and the integration of wireless communications do genuinely bring additional benefits to the photographer.

Nikon D5300 - Design and handling

Nikon is very pleased that it has achieved a new way of constructing camera bodies, which it describes as a 'monocoque'. Instead of there being a chassis, onto which the components and the body shell are attached, the D5300 is designed to have everything screwed to the insides of the body form itself: exoskeleton, rather then the usual endoskeleton.

Image: The top of the camera houses only a few control points, keeping the layout simple and unintimidating for newcomers. A stereo microphone lives in front of the hotshoe

The D5300's body shell is also made of a new material, although Nikon won't say what that new material is - just that it is new. The upshot is that the body is less heavy than it might have been, and is 25g lighter, including the battery, than the camera it doesn't replace, the D5200.

I'm not entirely sure that when I used the camera I could appreciate the exact weight loss that has occurred, but I was able to enjoy the fact that this is truly a lightweight DSLR, of the type that we might not mind carrying all day, over the shoulder, in a bag or in a large pocket. The body is very small too, although it is balanced with a reassuringly large grip for the right hand. It seems ironic that a small and light camera should need a large grip, but I found it allowed me to be aware I was carrying the camera, and should a larger lens be attached it will help to support the forward pull of such a weight distribution.

Image: The body styling will be familiar to those used to the Nikon 5000 series, as will the standard menu. The 3.2in flip-out screen has impressive visibility

The buttons are arranged much as one might expect, with all the principal controls falling easily to the finger or thumb. The rear 3.2in LCD is very nicely bright and clear, with its 1.037-million-dot resolution. Nikon has set the viewing panel into the glass screen, so there are no gaps or internal reflections, which produces good contrast and a clear view from a quoted angled of up to 170°. I am impressed.

In live view, the screen works well when the camera is held low or high, and I found the AF quick enough and seemingly accurate. The response of the shutter in live view also seems good.

Image: Nikon has retained its choice of layouts for the rear-screen display, with text-based and graphically expressed options to suit personal preferences

Nikon D5300 - Still to test

The principal changes in this model are of the sort that will only be proved in testing, but at this stage their potential is worth pointing out. Using the higher-capacity Expeed 4 processor, Nikon claims it has been able to reduce noise in its images through the use of more complicated calculations. A related benefit is that now noise levels are lower the company is comfortable offering a higher ISO setting - the Nikon D5300 allows ratings of up to ISO 25,600. More complex calculations also provide the potential for better white balance assessment in automatic modes via a more comprehensive assessment of the scene, and a better rendition of colour overall.

Lower noise should also lead to better resolution of detail from the 24.2-million-pixel sensor, as should Nikon's decision to do without the micro-blurring effects of a low-pass (anti-aliasing) filter. Leaving the low-pass filter off the sensor has become very fashionable, and I suspect it will be a great draw for many photographers. Moiré in images created by a sensor with 24 million pixels, even an APS-C-sized sensor, is still something that is quite likely to occur, but there is also plenty of software to correct it after the event.

The other thing to note is that this model sees the introduction of a new battery cell, which Nikon says increases capacity from 500 shots to 600 compared to the cell used in the D5200. It annoys me when companies change their battery forms, but on this occasion the new cell and that used in the D5200 are interchangeable.

Obviously, I couldn't test the battery life of the camera, but we should take the increase as good news. I will also have to wait to test the Wi-Fi and GPS capabilities of this new model, but neither can be held as negative points just for their inclusion. The Wi-Fi integration means users will be able to control the camera from an Android or iOS device, and will be able to wirelessly transfer images for viewing, editing and sending while on the go.

Image: The new battery, which is backwards compatible with the D5200, offers a longer life. There is no low-pass filter on the sensor, for extra resolution

Nikon D5300 - Conclusion

It would be easy to dismiss the Nikon D5300 for being too similar to the D5200, but that really isn't the point. There is not much wrong with the D5200, and the changes that this new model brings can only make it better. Perhaps Nikon could have called it the D5200 ll, but I'm not sure it matters one bit.

The Nikon D5300 will cost around £730 body only and be available from 14 November.


Source: Amateurphotographer

Nikon D5300 hands-on review

Nikon Nikon D5300 Buy Cheap at a glance:

  • 24.2-million-pixel, APS-C-sized CMOS sensor
  • 1.037-million-dot, 3.2in, 170° LCD screen
  • Expeed 4 image processor
  • 39-point AF system with nine cross-type sensors
  • ISO 100-25,600
  • Price £730 body only

Nikon D5300 - Introduction

While the serious enthusiast is unlikely to be swayed into buying a Nikon DSLR over a Canon model purely because the Nikon camera is newer, the reality is that at the non-premium end of the market this is how some people make their buying decisions. 'Newer' must mean 'better'.

This demand for the 'new' explains why we see such short product cycles in the camera market, and why manufacturers feel the need to introduce even small advances in technology or feature sets in cameras with completely new names - rather than a 'Mark II' type of naming format.

Those familiar with Nikon's range of DSLRs may not see the sense in the company's introduction of the new D5300, especially as Nikon will maintain the D5200 alongside this model in the range - new and old together. By doing so, though, Nikon expands the number of cameras it has on offer and the number of price points it can cover, while also being able to have a model that can carry a 'New' sticker, and which introduces new features to the price band in which it will sit.

That's not to say that the Nikon D5300 isn't different to the D5200, though, as a new processor, new body design and the integration of wireless communications do genuinely bring additional benefits to the photographer.

Nikon D5300 - Design and handling

Nikon is very pleased that it has achieved a new way of constructing camera bodies, which it describes as a 'monocoque'. Instead of there being a chassis, onto which the components and the body shell are attached, the D5300 is designed to have everything screwed to the insides of the body form itself: exoskeleton, rather then the usual endoskeleton.

Image: The top of the camera houses only a few control points, keeping the layout simple and unintimidating for newcomers. A stereo microphone lives in front of the hotshoe

The D5300's body shell is also made of a new material, although Nikon won't say what that new material is - just that it is new. The upshot is that the body is less heavy than it might have been, and is 25g lighter, including the battery, than the camera it doesn't replace, the D5200.

I'm not entirely sure that when I used the camera I could appreciate the exact weight loss that has occurred, but I was able to enjoy the fact that this is truly a lightweight DSLR, of the type that we might not mind carrying all day, over the shoulder, in a bag or in a large pocket. The body is very small too, although it is balanced with a reassuringly large grip for the right hand. It seems ironic that a small and light camera should need a large grip, but I found it allowed me to be aware I was carrying the camera, and should a larger lens be attached it will help to support the forward pull of such a weight distribution.

Image: The body styling will be familiar to those used to the Nikon 5000 series, as will the standard menu. The 3.2in flip-out screen has impressive visibility

The buttons are arranged much as one might expect, with all the principal controls falling easily to the finger or thumb. The rear 3.2in LCD is very nicely bright and clear, with its 1.037-million-dot resolution. Nikon has set the viewing panel into the glass screen, so there are no gaps or internal reflections, which produces good contrast and a clear view from a quoted angled of up to 170°. I am impressed.

In live view, the screen works well when the camera is held low or high, and I found the AF quick enough and seemingly accurate. The response of the shutter in live view also seems good.

Image: Nikon has retained its choice of layouts for the rear-screen display, with text-based and graphically expressed options to suit personal preferences

Nikon D5300 - Still to test

The principal changes in this model are of the sort that will only be proved in testing, but at this stage their potential is worth pointing out. Using the higher-capacity Expeed 4 processor, Nikon claims it has been able to reduce noise in its images through the use of more complicated calculations. A related benefit is that now noise levels are lower the company is comfortable offering a higher ISO setting - the Nikon D5300 allows ratings of up to ISO 25,600. More complex calculations also provide the potential for better white balance assessment in automatic modes via a more comprehensive assessment of the scene, and a better rendition of colour overall.

Lower noise should also lead to better resolution of detail from the 24.2-million-pixel sensor, as should Nikon's decision to do without the micro-blurring effects of a low-pass (anti-aliasing) filter. Leaving the low-pass filter off the sensor has become very fashionable, and I suspect it will be a great draw for many photographers. Moiré in images created by a sensor with 24 million pixels, even an APS-C-sized sensor, is still something that is quite likely to occur, but there is also plenty of software to correct it after the event.

The other thing to note is that this model sees the introduction of a new battery cell, which Nikon says increases capacity from 500 shots to 600 compared to the cell used in the D5200. It annoys me when companies change their battery forms, but on this occasion the new cell and that used in the D5200 are interchangeable.

Obviously, I couldn't test the battery life of the camera, but we should take the increase as good news. I will also have to wait to test the Wi-Fi and GPS capabilities of this new model, but neither can be held as negative points just for their inclusion. The Wi-Fi integration means users will be able to control the camera from an Android or iOS device, and will be able to wirelessly transfer images for viewing, editing and sending while on the go.

Image: The new battery, which is backwards compatible with the D5200, offers a longer life. There is no low-pass filter on the sensor, for extra resolution

Nikon D5300 - Conclusion

It would be easy to dismiss the Nikon D5300 for being too similar to the D5200, but that really isn't the point. There is not much wrong with the D5200, and the changes that this new model brings can only make it better. Perhaps Nikon could have called it the D5200 ll, but I'm not sure it matters one bit.

The Nikon D5300 will cost around £730 body only and be available from 14 November.


Source: Amateurphotographer